Posted in Books, creativity, TED talks

TED Talk: Steven Johnson about the Idea Process

How the ideas are born? Where and when is the ideal place and time to come up with ideas?

Steven Johnson author of the book “Where Good Ideas Come From” gives a remarkable talk about the recipe for creating a great idea.

“We take ideas from other people, from people we’ve learned from, from people we run into in the coffee shop, and we stitch them together into new forms and we create something new. That’s really where innovation happens.”

Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

 

For more on his theories and findings, read his book “Where Good Ideas Come From“.

 

Posted in Books, Personality, TED talks

TED Talk: Susan Cain about The Quiet in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

Susan Cain is a former corporate lawyer and negotiations consultant — and a self-described introvert. At least one-third of the people we know are introverts, notes Cain in her book QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. Although our culture undervalues them dramatically, introverts have made some of the great contributions to society — from Chopin’s nocturnes to the invention of the personal computer to Ghandi’s transformative leadership.

One remarkable book everyone should read!

Quiet Quotes

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking“The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it’s a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers — of persistence, concentration, and insight — to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.”

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“So stay true to your own nature. If you like to do things in a slow and steady way, don’t let others make you feel as if you have to race. If you enjoy depth, don’t force yourself to seek breadth. If you prefer single-tasking to multi-tasking, stick to your guns. Being relatively unmoved by rewards gives you the incalculable power to go your own way.”

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“Indeed, your biggest challenge may be to fully harness your strengths. You may be so busy trying to appear like a zestful, reward-sensitive extrovert that you undervalue your own talents, or feel underestimated by those around you. But when you’re focused on a project that you care about, you probably find that your energy is boundless.”

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“Introverts need to trust their gut and share their ideas as powerfully as they can. This does not mean aping extroverts; ideas can be shared quietly, they can be communicated in writing, they can be packaged into highly produced lectures, they can be advanced by allies. The trick for introverts is to honor their own styles instead of allowing themselves to be swept up by prevailing norms.” ― Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

Posted in Books, Management, success, Workplace

The 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work, and Team with Positive Energy

 

  • Rule #1 – “You’re the driver of your bus”  – We are each responsible for the direction of our lives. And the direction of our lives is 81107shaped by each day. If we are complacent in our lives we let others drive for us. Have you ever felt out of control? Well, it’s time to take charge and drive your own bus.
  • Rule #2 – “Desire, Vision, and Focus Move Your Bus in the Right Direction” – You have to want it! You have to have a vision, have an compelling reason to keep you moving and the focus to keep to it. Each action must be in the direction of your goal and you must have the persistence to overcome the obstacles that can easily get you off track.
  • Rule #3 – “Fuel Your Ride with Positive Energy” – Positive energy is the fuel that allows you to overcome the obstacles. Positive energy is high octane fuel and negative energy is gas from the bottom of last years can. Positive energy builds momentum and a negative attitude seems to find roadblocks and excuses.
  • Rule #4 – “Invite People on Your Bus and Share Your Vision for the Road Ahead” – Associating with people who push you forward is one of the smartest things you can do. You are either moving forward or moving back. If the people you work with or associate with are stagnant, then you need to break free. If you don’t you’re wearing an invisible rubber belt, eventually you will snap back to the pack and lose your momentum. Having negative, going nowhere friends is like having a weekly weight watchers meeting at The Country Buffet.
  • Rule #7 – “Enthusiasm Attracts More Passengers and Energizes Them During the Ride” – People want to associate with a winner. In professiona land college  sports it seems that the same teams are at or near the top year after year. Players recognize a good culture and want to be a part of it. The same can be said of work teams and companies. It’s not all about the money.
  • Rule #8 – “Love Your Passengers” – You can’t fake it. In order to lead people or attract people to your cause you have to care for them. And not in an ambivalent way. You must really be tied to the well being of your team. Love cannot be selfish. As a leader you must want the best for your team members. Back to sports: time and time again you see a team of superior athletes being beat by a true team made up of individuals who would do anything for their team and teammates. The trick is to cultivate that love.
  • Rule #10 – “Have Fun and Enjoy the Ride” – When work is fun you don’t get tired. Do you ever remember getting tired when you were playing as a kid? I don’t either. It never even came to mind. The same is true when you are energized by doing work that matters with people you like.

The Energy Bus By: Jon Gordon

 

 

Posted in Books, Management, Workplace

12 Questions to Measure How Strong is Your Workplace

As read in “First, Break All The Rules” or What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently:

These twelve questions are the simplest and most accurate way to measure the strength of  a workplace. They measure the core elements needed to attract, focus, and keep the most talented
employees.

  • Do I know what is expected of me at work?
  • Do I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right?
  • At work, do I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day?
  • In the last seven days, have I received recognition or praise for doing good work?
  • Does my supervisor, or someone at work, seem to care about me as a person?
  • Is there someone at work who encourages my development?
  • At work, do my opinions seem to count?
  • Does the mission/purpose of my company make me feel my job is important?
  • Are my co-workers committed to doing quality work?
  • Do I  have a best friend at work?
  • In the last six months, has someone at work talked to me about my progress?
  • This last year, have I had the opportunities at work to learn and grow?

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