Posted in communication, success, TED talks, Workplace

TED Talk: Julian Treasure of How to Speak to be Heard

 

What did I learn from Julian Treasure’s talk?

Seven deadly SINS of speaking. Let’s all try to avoid them!

  1. Gossip
  2. Judging
  3. Negativity
  4. Complaining
  5. Excuses
  6. Exaggeration/ lying
  7. Dogmatism

♠ ♠ ♠

Four elements which will improve the speech to be more powerful and important for the audience:

  1. Honesty = being true to what you say, being straight and clear
  2. Authenticity = just being yourself
  3. Integritybeing your word,actually doing what you say, and being somebody people can trust
  4. Love = wishing people well

♠ ♠ ♠

Six tools which will increase the power of speaking if used in the right way:

  1. Register – speak with deep lower voice if you want to project power and with authority;
  2. Timbre the way the voice feels (people prefer voices which are rich, smooth and warm);
  3. Prosody – the patterns of stress and intonation in speaking;
  4. Pace – how quickly we speak;
  5. Pitch – high or low
  6. Volume

 

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Posted in success, TED talks, Workplace

TED Talk: Richard St. John About the Secrets of Success

Presenting two brief, but insightful and inspirational talks by the success analyst Richard St. John

Here are the 8 secrets of SUCCESS:

  1. Have PASSION and LOVE what you do.
  2. WORK hard and have FUN while you work.
  3. Be GOOD in what you do and PRACTICE, practice, practice.
  4. FOCUS on ONE thing.
  5. PUSH yourself mentally and physically.
  6. SERVE others something of VALUE.
  7. Have IDEAS.
  8. PERSIST through failure, criticism, rejection, assholes and pressure.

 

Thank you, Richard St. John, for being successful and reveal the 8-traits to be great!

… and here is my next good read …

8 to Be Great: The 8-Traits That Lead to Great Success

Posted in TED talks, Workplace

TED Talk: Scott Dinsmore about How to Find a Work You’ll Enjoy

“… Of the people I’d sit down with for lunch, 80 percent would quit their job within two months.” 

“Why are you doing the work that you’re doing?” And so often their answer would be, “Well, because somebody told me I’m supposed to.” And I realized that so many people around us are climbing their way up this ladder that someone tells them to climb, and it ends up being leaned up against the wrong wall, or no wall at all.” says Scott Dinsmore.